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  • Economic research consolidation: Developing a blueprint for the South African economy

    Copyright © 2022 Inclusive Society Institute 50 Long Street Cape Town, 8000 South Africa 235-515 NPO All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the permission in writing from the Inclusive Society Institute DISCLAIMER Views expressed in this report do not necessarily represent the views of the Inclusive Society Institute or those of their respective Board or Council members. All records and findings included in this report, originate from a panel discussion on developing a new economic blueprint for South Africa, which took place in March 2022 Author: Mariaan Webb Editor: Daryl Swanepoel Contents Abbreviations & acronyms Introduction Main themes Policy, regulation and legislation Government action Collaboration between government and private sector Seizing opportunities Energy crisis Other considerations Comparative research Historical analysis Counterfactual scenario Interventions for economic modelling Efficient bureaucracy Energy crisis Government coordination crisis Transport and logistics Private-sector deregulation Confirmation of property ownership through secure title Private-sector collaboration Downside risks Macroeconomic considerations Conclusion References Annexure A: Economic growth constraints per sector Annexure B: Interventions for fostering economic growth per sector Abbreviations & acronyms GDP gross domestic product GFC global financial crisis ISI Inclusive Society Institute PPP public–private partnership REIPPPP Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme SMME small and medium-sized and micro enterprise SoE State-owned enterprise Introduction In recent years South Africa has performed poorly on several important economic measures, including unemployment and inequality. With the world’s highest unemployment rate and most unequal society, the country is in dire need of accelerated and more inclusive growth. After consistent economic growth in the decade leading up to 2007, South Africa’s progress slowed dramatically after the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2008/9. In the years immediately following the GFC, the gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate has hovered between 2% and 3% and, from 2014 onwards, stagnated at about 1% before reaching an historic 6.4% contraction in the pandemic-hit year of 2020 (World Bank, 2022). The sustained period of low economic growth is reflected in rising unemployment and poverty. The most recent data indicates that unemployment rose to a record of 35.30% in the fourth quarter of 2021. Using the expanded definition, unemployment is at 46.20% (Stats SA, 2022). Unless South Africa achieves faster and more inclusive economic growth, the country’s goals of eliminating poverty and reducing inequality and unemployment, will remain unachieved. The Inclusive Society Institute (ISI) has embarked on a comprehensive economic research project that will culminate in a blueprint for rebooting South Africa’s economy. The first phase of the three-phase study delved into international experiences of economies that were in dire straits but managed to turn themselves around. The second phase included a series of dialogues with various sectoral stakeholders and policymakers to gain a sectoral understanding of the policies that must be corrected and to find new initiatives to shift the economy onto a higher growth trajectory. The sectors covered include agriculture, construction, energy, mining, financial, foreign investment, hospitality, information communication and technology, manufacturing, and retail. The ISI’s research entered a consolidation phase in March 2022, bringing together several industry experts to identify the themes that require public policy interventions, as well as the priority structural reforms that should be introduced to revive the South African economy. This document is the outcome of the first consolidation exercise and identifies the main themes, interventions and policy changes that should be considered as well as the key interventions that should be included in a formal economic modelling exercise. The final report will highlight key findings of the economic modelling exercise with the aim of projecting the potential impact of policy adjustments and structural reforms over the short, medium and long term. The blueprint will be shared with government departments, including the National Treasury, and will be presented to political parties, public policy institutions and public bodies, such as Parliament and Parliamentary Committees. Main themes This section identifies the main themes that must form part of the final blueprint. These themes were identified in the research thus far, including the sectoral discussions and during the consolidation exercise. Policy, regulation and legislation Government can resolve several constraints to economic growth by assessing the true economic impact of many of its policies, regulations and legislation. Simplifying policies and reducing layers of regulatory red tape will go a long way in promoting sectoral growth. Removing administrative barriers will free up funds and human capital that could be applied elsewhere to drive growth. Further, government should measure the outcomes of certain pieces of legislation and transformation policies against their intended goals and, where necessary, use the results to amend or abolish regulations that are not achieving their aims. In some instances measures to compensate for market failures will be required. These policies and regulations should, however, be crafted with great caution. A review of the economic impact of policies, regulations and legislation will assist in resolving: policy uncertainty outdated policies prohibitive transformation policies excessive regulations the high cost of doing business onerous labour laws insufficient competition tenders and procurement issues environment unsustainability The reduction of red tape should be prioritised in: transport subsidies independent electricity investments by firms reducing the cost of doing business labour market reforms re-evaluating transformation policies creating a responsible investment environment reviewing the tender process creating policies that bolster competition incentivising localisation Government action To stimulate economic growth, it is imperative for government to improve its capacity and effectiveness if it is to honour its role in the social compact. Crucial to this is appointing skilled staff to the relevant positions in all spheres of government as the State seeks to regain its strength. These appointments must result in a marked improvement in service delivery, most notably water supply and logistical infrastructure. Overhauling the education system should be a matter of urgency. South Africa cannot create enduring economic growth using outdated skills and knowledge. Strengthening law enforcement is another crucial step. Corruption and crime reduce investor confidence and drain the fiscus and must, therefore, be dealt with decisively. Ineffectual State-owned entities (SoEs) are also a drain on finances. Those that cannot be saved and not required for national strategic interest, must be severed. This will free up money to spend elsewhere in support of proven growth strategies. Improved government capacity will assist in resolving: the failure to implement policies and/or strategies inadequate infrastructure failing service delivery poor global benchmarking weak government institutions slow vaccination roll-out the skills deficit Improved State capacity should be prioritised in: strengthening leadership curbing crime and corruption strengthening local government establishing an e-government administration developing smaller, more-focused, projects cleaning up SoEs securing electricity supply improved project management and infrastructure investment developing necessary skills Collaboration between government and private sector The state of South Africa’s public finances requires government to mobilise extensive private participation if it hopes to pull the economy from the doldrums. At the same time, business requires government’s support if it is to capitalise on new generation technologies and opportunities. Steps must be taken by government and the private sector to repair the trust deficit following a fraught number of years, owing to, among other things, corruption and State capture. Mutually beneficial arrangements and public–private partnerships (PPPs) can be devised to resolve pressing economic issues. Furthermore, it will bode well for the private sector to have amicable relations with the public and surrounding communities, as this will contribute to better buy-in from communities and boost the success rate of large-scale projects. Collaboration between government and the private sector must be improved to: access funds more easily rebuild the trust deficit between the public and the private sector address exchange rate volatility increase digital technology access reject environmentally unsustainable projects tackle poverty and unemployment address the skills deficit Improved government and private-sector relations should be prioritised in: access to finance skills transfer and development reducing unemployment creating PPPs rebuilding trust between government and the private sector driving new technology investment and productivity Seizing opportunities The South African economy risks falling behind many of its peers. Government and business must better take advantage of new opportunities that arise. The global economy is searching for partners that can keep up with the fast pace of technological, environmental, political and social changes happening worldwide. The upside of globalisation means South Africa can capitalise on these opportunities while using them to uplift local communities. By intertwining expertise and strategies, the private sector together with the State can be a driving force in positioning the country as a strong African economy, a gateway to Africa, a geopolitical force not to be overlooked by investors. Improving the seizure of opportunities will assist in: expediting technology commercialisation overcoming the lag in innovation The seizing of opportunities should be prioritised in: pursuing green initiatives developing a green hydrogen economy and green hydrogen exports enhancing competitive strengths creating a geopolitical alternative strengthening intercontinental trade promoting new mining activities rebuilding mining exploration, especially for energy metals transforming special economic zones revitalising rural economies and strengthening rural security and infrastructure further boostinig agricultural technology and agricultural exports Energy crisis The crisis in the electricity sector is considered to be at the heart of South Africa’s economic malaise and unless resolved with urgency, it is unlikely that economic interventions will succeed. The country must organise itself better to take advantage of low-carbon investment opportunities and collectively rally behind the adoption of renewable energy, which is a modular solution that can be implemented more rapidly and more cheaply than alternatives. There is pent up demand for investment in renewable energy, but regulatory barriers must be removed. While there is a shift to solar and wind electricity generation, State-owned power utility Eskom will continue to supply a large part of the country’s electricity. Eskom’s unsustainable debt needs to be resolved so that it can raise financing for investment in transmission and distribution infrastructure. At the same time, government must clearly signal the building of a new energy system that is reliable, greener and advances the country to its carbon neutrality goals. Resolving the energy crisis will assist in addressing: the high cost of doing business inadequate infrastructure failing service delivery environmental unsustainability weak government institutions excessive regulations Interventions to resolve the energy crisis should be prioritised in: dealing with Eskom’s debt problems ensuring a predictable price path removing regulatory barriers to private energy investment enhancing private-sector involvement sharpening the focus on sustainable developments developing more technical skills and capabilities Other considerations This section summarises some of the points that were made by industry experts during the consolidation exercise. Comparative research A question was raised about the findings from the ISI-led research, compared with similar research undertaken by government and other research institutions regarding the structural reforms that are required. The point was made that the National Treasury modelled the economic impact of structural reforms and that it is included in the Budget documents. However, it was pointed out that at the time when the Treasury modelled the impact of reforms on the network industries on growth, its focus was only on improving Eskom’s energy availability factor. It is felt that this model is outdated, as much of the electricity infrastructure development is happening outside Eskom. Historical analysis A suggestion was made that the blueprint should include an historical analysis of the periods of strong growth and employment creation that South Africa enjoyed since 1994. The factors behind the growth success must be considered, including the policies that were pursued, the strength of the network infrastructure, and the periods of booming commodities markets. South Africa recorded its fastest growth rates since the 1960s from 2004 to 2007, with real GDP growth averaging 5.20% a year (Industrial Development Corporation, 2013). Counterfactual scenario It was suggested that the report provide for a counterfactual scenario, which sketches the South Africa that could possibly be. For instance, to show where South Africa could have been today, had it taken a different path ten years ago. This could prime policymakers to be more open to suggestions that are put forward. An alternative to a counterfactual scenario could be to reflect and build on what is working. Some examples include the shift in the energy space towards new technology and an energy transition, or the policy shifts around freight logistics group Transnet and private-sector participation in rail and terminal operators. Rather than dwelling on the problem statement too much, the report could lift out “pockets of success” and consider whether they could be built upon to have a greater impact. Interventions for economic modelling This section focuses on suggested interventions and policy changes that should be considered for economic modelling. Modelling will quantify the impact of the suggested interventions on the economy. Efficient bureaucracy Efficient bureaucracy should be modelled. For instance, what the implications would be if South Africa cut red tape and adhered to regulatory approval timelines that are of an acceptable international standard. Energy crisis The roadmap must deal with the energy crisis in a focused manner. Specific energy-related actions with specific outcomes must be identified and modelled, such as the impact of the 100 MW reform that will boost private investment in electricity generation; the impact of the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (REIPPPP) bid windows (as well the negative impact of delays on the REIPPPP), the impact of resolving Eskom’s unsustainable debt and allowing for it to return to capital markets to fund its investments. Government coordination crisis In addition to the electricity supply crisis, there is a crisis of government coordination, or lack thereof. Although difficult to model, because it touches across so many aspects, it is one of the key reasons behind the lack of implementation in the public sector. Transport and logistics A model for transport and logistics must be pursued, considering the debilitating impact that failures in this regard are having on the economy. For instance, economic modelling could determine the value in terms of GDP growth and trade benefits. Private-sector deregulation The implications of deregulating the private sector, and specifically small, medium-sized and micro enterprises (SMMEs), must be modelled, with the examples of South Korea and New Zealand to be drawn on. The deregulation of SMMEs should not have a major cost implication for government, but could get the economy moving while other issues of electricity and infrastructure are being addressed. Confirmation of property ownership through secure title Security of title deeds for those occupying properties could be pursued. A model has already been developed that shows that giving people ownership of the properties that they occupy has a positive impact on their finances, on investment and on economic development. Private-sector collaboration Although difficult to model, the report should consider the implications of a positive mode of collaboration between government and the private sector. Downside risks The ‘downside risk’ posed by the disintegrating social fabric, lawlessness and the dysfunctional and ineffective criminal justice system must be considered and modelled. Macroeconomic considerations To achieve the objectives of the final blueprint, fiscal concerns must be balanced with inclusive growth. Balancing fiscal concerns with inclusive growth Source: Minsat, 2020 The National Treasury presented two debt scenarios in the June 2020 Supplementary Budget. In the passive scenario, which is not deemed a viable option for South Africa and was presented for illustrative purposes only, debt will spiral upwards, exceeding 100% of GDP from 2022. The possibility that government will not be able to repay its debt leads to higher debt-servicing costs. This redirects money that could be spent on health, education, and other policy priorities to local and overseas bondholders (National Treasury, 2020). In the active scenario, government stabilises debt through a combination of reforms and measures to boost economic growth, increase revenue collection and lower expenditure. The deficit would be reduced significantly starting in 2021 and the debt level would start decreasing from a peak of 87% of GDP in 2023 (National Treasury, 2020). The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development has proposed a progressive consolidation scenario where government does not pursue highly constrictive fiscal policy and the reduction of the deficit happens over a longer period. In this scenario, the debt level will stabilise by 2028. This progressive consolidation scenario is based on a deficit reduction of 1% a year of GDP and 2% GDP growth from 2025 (Minsat, 2021). Although there are differing views about the approach to debt reduction, taking a longer-term approach to fiscal consolidation could free up capital for investment in economic infrastructure that would be beneficial to economic growth. Pension funds must also be encouraged to invest in infrastructure, following amendments to Regulation 28 of the Pension Fund Act. However, this will require confidence in the ability of the State to be able to prioritise and prepare proper economic plans around bankable infrastructure projects. Conclusion The consensus from the panel participating in the ISI’s consolidation exercise is that the sectoral deliberations have arrived at good insights, but that the research must be further refined to make it more precise and specific in identifying key interventions to lift the pace of inclusive growth. The ISI’s final report must not dwell on the problem statement too much and should instead focus on ‘what’ needs to be done and ‘how’. It must avoid being ‘another list of good intentions’. The blueprint must offer an economically coherent approach – based on clear cause and effect, and on an appreciation of the positive impact on growth of improved efficiencies and capabilities of the State, capital, labour and new technologies. Rather than being purely theoretical, the blueprint must provide practical and immediate action steps for implementation. It is understood that not every issue can be tackled at once, thus, the blueprint should prioritise interventions, not only in terms of capacity, but also in terms of financial ability, taking into account the fiscal constraints facing South Africa. References Eskom. 2022. Weekly system status: Week 10, March 13, 2022. [Online]. Available at: https://www.eskom.co.za/eskom-divisions/tx/system-adequacyreports/[accessed March 31, 2022]. Industrial Development Corporation. 2013. The South African economy: An overview of key trends since 1994, December 2013. [Online]. Available at: https://www.idc.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/IDC-RI-publication-Overview-of-key-trends-in-SA-economy-since-1994.pdf [accessed March 31, 2022]. Minsat, A, 2021. Reinvigorating South Africa’s Economy: Key Considerations, Inclusive Society Institute panel discussion. April 14, 2021. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. National Treasury. 2021. Budget Review 2021, February 24, 2021. [Online]. Available at http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/National%20Budget/2021/review/FullBR.pdf [accessed May 10, 2021]. Statistics South Africa. 2022. Quarterly Labour Force Survey – Q4: 2021, March 29, 2022. [Online]. Available at: http://www.statssa.gov.za/publications/P0211/Media%20release%20QLFS%20Q4%202021.pdf [accessed March 31, 2022]. World Bank. 2022. GDP growth (annual percentage) – South Africa, 2022. [Online]. Available at: https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.MKTP.KD.ZG?end=2020&locations=ZA&start=2003 [accessed March 31, 2022]. Annexure A: Economic growth constraints per sector Annexure B: Interventions for fostering economic growth per sector - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - This report has been published by the Inclusive Society Institute The Inclusive Society Institute (ISI) is an autonomous and independent institution that functions independently from any other entity. It is founded for the purpose of supporting and further deepening multi-party democracy. The ISI’s work is motivated by its desire to achieve non-racialism, non-sexism, social justice and cohesion, economic development and equality in South Africa, through a value system that embodies the social and national democratic principles associated with a developmental state. It recognises that a well-functioning democracy requires well-functioning political formations that are suitably equipped and capacitated. It further acknowledges that South Africa is inextricably linked to the ever transforming and interdependent global world, which necessitates international and multilateral cooperation. As such, the ISI also seeks to achieve its ideals at a global level through cooperation with like-minded parties and organs of civil society who share its basic values. In South Africa, ISI’s ideological positioning is aligned with that of the current ruling party and others in broader society with similar ideals. Email: info@inclusivesociety.org.za Phone: +27 (0) 21 201 1589 Web: www.inclusivesociety.org.za

  • Rejuvenating South Africa's economy - Labour sector input

    Copyright © 2022 Inclusive Society Institute 50 Long Street Cape Town, 8000 South Africa 235-515 NPO All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the permission in writing from the Inclusive Society Institute DISCLAIMER Views expressed in this report do not necessarily represent the views of the Inclusive Society Institute or those of their respective Board or Council members. All records and findings included in this report, originate from a panel discussion on developing a new economic blueprint for South Africa, which took place in February 2022 Author: Olivia Main Editor: Daryl Swanepoel Contents Introduction Key growth constraints Neoliberal macroeconomics Lack of localisation Corrupt politicians roam free Too many policies Not enough urgency Foreign nationals and casualisation Towards a new growth path Conclusion References Cover page image: www.mg.co.za Introduction On 2 March 2022, Employment and Labour Minister, Thulas Nxesi, officially tabled the National Labour Migration Policy (NLMP) for public comment and engagement. Touting the policy as the first time in the history of South Africa that government has formulated a comprehensive NLMP, the Minister said that “government have researched extensively and benchmarked internationally in search of policy based on best practice”. Together with the tabled NLMP, amendments to the Employment Services Act (of 2014) were proposed to limit the extent to which employers can employ foreign nationals (BizNews, 2022). And this is all good news. It points to the government’s willingness to look at labour laws that are not working and change them. But it is not enough. South Africa’s reputation – in fact its very standing – as the industrialised leader of the African continent is diminishing. On Statista.com, South Africa is listed as the third-largest economy in Africa in 2021 with a GDP of US$329.53-billion, trailing behind Egypt (GDP US$394.28-billion) and Nigeria (GDP US$514.05-billion). Our strength on the world stage has never been weaker (Statista, 2022). The situation does not look any better back home. According to the Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) carried out by Stats SA, the number of employed persons declined by 660 000 to 14,3 million for the 3rd quarter of 2021 compared to the 2nd quarter of the same year. South Africa’s unemployment rate in Q3:2021 increased by 0,5 of a percentage point to 34,9%. This is the highest official unemployment rate recorded since the start of the QLFS in 2008 (Stats SA, 2021). It seems there is room for improvement in just about every sphere of the economy. The Inclusive Society Institute has committed to an intensive three-phase research project, culminating in a blueprint for rejuvenating and reigniting South Africa’s flailing economy. This map will, ultimately, be shared with government representatives in the presidency and other important policy institutions and public bodies, such as Parliament, in 2022. A dialogue, hosted by the institute, brought together trade unionists from across a number of unions – as part of the second phase, to interrogate what in terms of the generally accepted economic architecture of the world South Africa is doing wrong. And to explore fresh out-of-the-box ideas that could grow the economy beyond the expected 2-3% to the 4-5% trajectory that is needed to really start chipping away at unemployment and backlogs (National Treasury, 2021). Key growth constraints Neoliberal macroeconomics The panel largely agreed that the South African government’s seemingly unapologetic neoliberal approach to running the economy is problematic. It was felt that the government relies too heavily on the private sector to cure social ills such as unemployment, while not doing any of the heavy lifting itself. In addition, the austerity measures that result from this neoliberalism is not speaking to the lived realities of South Africans. With no state-led development – and the private sector seemingly on an investment strike – money is not ending up in the pockets of the people. The trickle-down effect that the country has been waiting to witness for years has not come, which means the people are excluded from taking part in the economy and, so doing, contribute to growth (Mail and Guardian, 2021). As things stand, South Africa finds itself in the so-called middle-income trap with a middle-income economy, failing to transition to a high-income economy due to rising costs and declining competitiveness (Daily Maverick, 2019). The country’s macroeconomic policies are not assisting its social and industrial policies. Expenditure on industrial incentives is lacking, which does little to grow manufacturing. As a result, South Africa’s social cohesion is being tested as economic strife is compounded by the high levels of inequality still seen in the spheres of healthcare and education, among many others. Lack of localisation Far too little of the South African rand is circulating in the country. Whether it is officials receiving kickbacks from imports or consumers not buying local products, discussants felt that South Africa is losing out due to a lack of localisation. Although good work has been done to get big clothing retailers like Foschini, Woolworths and Markham’s to buy local, a lot more is needed. And not only from industry. As one discussant put it, ordinary consumers must also contribute, saying that “we should all make a little bit of effort to check the label on the trousers we choose to wear”. Additionally, too much revenue is lost to manufacturing done overseas. South Africa is a large producer of raw materials. The fact that those materials are shipped elsewhere and turned into consumable goods amounts to big losses when it comes to taxation, job creation and keeping money circulating within our borders. In a sign of the country’s lagging manufacturing capability, Trade, Industry and Competition Minister Ebrahim Patel recently requested the social partners at the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC) to consider an import-substitution target of 20% for non-petroleum imports, which he argued could drive progressive localisation worth up to R200-billion over the coming five years. According to the minister, South Africa’s “propensity to import is out of line with peer countries and developed economies and more can sensibly and sustainably be produced locally” (Engineering News, 2021). Corrupt politicians roam free The panel was unanimous in their assessment that the South African prison system has too few corrupt politicians in its jails. The individuals who have stolen from South Africa for what seems like an eternity must be punished – and punished publicly and with consequences. Simply put, the crooks must go to jail. South Africa lost R1.5-trillion through corruption in the years between 2014 and 2019 (News24, 2021). And it is not only the government’s coffers that are being cleaned out. All over the country, copper cables are disappearing from railways faster than they can be replaced. Transnet and PRASA have seen the systematic destruction of their infrastructure by criminal syndicates over the past two years. Without money, the economy cannot grow. Without cables the trains cannot run. Commuters cannot get to work. Goods cannot get to ports. The panel felt that if the police and the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) do not act, SOEs like PRASA will soon be gone. In addition, the public will not have confidence in the integrity of the leaders of society. Leaders such as Siyabonga Gama and Anoj Singh, former executives of state-owned infrastructure firm Transnet, as well as Brian Molefe, former CEO of public utility firm Eskom, who the Zondo Commission recommended be investigated for corruption and racketeering amounting to millions of dollars. The latest part of the report also implicates senior political leaders of the ruling African National Congress itself (Al Jazeera, 2022). Too many policies South Africa’s long history of policy changes reads as follows: In 1994, the Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP) was chosen as the primary socio-economic programme. Two years later, government introduced the Growth, Employment and Redistribution (GEAR) programme to stimulate faster economic growth than RDP had managed. GEAR was replaced in 2005 by the even faster Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (ASGISA) as a further development on the first two developmental strategies. Shortly after ASGISA came the New Growth Path (NGP), which was followed, in early 2013, by the National Development Plan (NDP) 2030 (South African History Online, 2014). In 2019 the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) put forward proposals for Master Plans for all 15 priority industries in the country in order to “target specific action points relating to the respective industries” (IOL, 2021). In total, therefore, a staggering 20 policies have made it onto the desks of government officials so far (SA History, 2014). The panel felt that such a large number of policies and the shifting ideologies between them is not the best way to take the country forward. The Master Plans have been in the making for three years and some are still not even concluded, while those policies that are currently in place are not being delivered on. Also problematic, is a dual system of social policies whereby one set of policies applies to the poor and another for the rich. A discussant also highlighted that to establish economic policies that are progressive, the youth and gender development must be considered. Not enough urgency South Africa’s economy is growing at a snail’s pace. Although growth was projected to rebound to 5.2% in 2021 (but that is still not enough to recover to pre-Covid 19 levels), the forecast is for the economy to slow to 1.9% in 2022 and 1.6% in 2023 (OECD, 2021). For a country brimming with natural resources, the growth rate is well below what can be achieved. In fact, it seems the only sphere showing real growth in the country is that of unemployment. The recent unemployment statistics released by Statistics South Africa show the rate of growth now sits at 34.9%, while under the expanded definition of unemployment, it rose from 44.2% to 46.6% (Daily Maverick, 2022). Yes, the recent social upheavals in the form of the looting in July 2021 are major setbacks that point to the fragile nature of the country’s social cohesion. But solutions to these problems have been tabled and are waiting to be actioned. Across the board, however, these well-thought-out policies and ideas are not being implemented. Promises are not kept as people in key positions seem to lack the energy, the will, or the know-how to act. A pertinent example is the National Anti-Corruption Strategy 2020-2030 (NACS). The first step in implementing the strategy is to establish an interim National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council, which has yet to happen, despite President Ramaphosa’s promise that it would be established by mid-2021 (Corruption Watch, 2022). Furthermore, from the names of those responsible for sabotaging Eskom, to the persons who stole directly from the State, the information about who did what has been made public. The natural – some might say inevitable – next phase to root out the problem would be to swiftly go into action and apprehend the criminals. But that is not happening. The panel felt that the slow speed of progress and political criminals still at large is, in large part, the result of a lack of political will. The ANC as the governing party has been indecisive and has thus far failed to restore the organisation to its former glory. It still has the overwhelming confidence of the majority of people in the country, but it is not able to lead a society as it has in the past. Foreign nationals and casualisation The twin issues of immigrant workers flocking to South Africa to gain employment and the country’s shift towards casualisation has profound implications both in terms of employment and social cohesion. At present, about three million of South Africa’s 60 million residents are migrants (Stats SA, 2022). Never, since the xenophobic attacks of 2008, has anti-immigrant sentiment been this high. In Gauteng recently, the Alexandra Dudula Movement and Operation Dudula have emerged with the joint purpose of ridding their townships of foreigners. Dudula loosely means to "push back" or "drive back" in isiZulu and gives an indication of the growing discontent among South African communities who feel marginalised. The campaigns of the two groups include a call for all undocumented African migrants to stop trading in Alexandra – a call they made clear by closing down all the stalls owned by foreign nationals who could not show the correct papers for running the business or a valid passport (BBC, 2022). The panel described foreign nationals working on a casual basis in South Africa as having a detrimental effect on the money earned and spent inside the country’s borders, together with taking employment opportunities away from hard-working citizens. As mentioned in the introduction to this report, a law is being finalised by government which will cap the number of foreigners that businesses owned by locals can hire. It remains to be seen whether the legislation will have a noticeable effect on the dire unemployment rate. Towards a new growth path Conclusion South Africa is a country with tremendous potential. As a discussant rightly pointed out, we are not dependent upon a single cash crop or commodity, like most African countries. We have a very diversified agricultural sector. We have all the infrastructure in the world, and we have a significant education system. Unfortunately, we are bearing witness to large parts of that potential coming to nothing through the actions – and inaction – of those we elected to represent us in what we hoped – and still do – is a democratic society. South Africa’s unemployment figures are dismal. The labour force is becoming less skilled. We are losing jobs to outsourcing and desperately poor people attracted to a country which until very recently still had the fastest-growing economy on the African continent. The outlook is poor, but the resolve of the people is not. Despite all the challenges and truly tragic events that have had this country in utter turmoil, South Africans are still pulling together and making things work. The SOEs are in dire straits, but they still exist. We have come through Covid-19 just as the rest of the world has, and let it be said that we still have a Rugby World Cup trophy – and the positivity that came from winning it – safe and secure in the country. However, people can only take so much, and the social cohesion of the country is not guaranteed. Real change is needed to bring about real hope. The labour sector invites all governing bodies to facilitate tangible changes to South Africans’ lived realities through constructive dialogue and innovative ideas – and action. The spirited discussions and the distilled solutions that come from these think tanks will then be in the public domain. More importantly, they will be within arm’s length of those with the power – and passion – to make a difference. References Al Jazeera. 2022. More S African corruption exposed in ‘state capture’ report, March 8, 2022. [Online]. Available at: https://www.aljazeera.com/features/2022/3/8/analysis-south-africas-state-capture-report-questions-anc-leg [accessed March 2, 2022]. BBC. 2021. Dudula: How South African anger has focused on foreigners, March 13, 2022. [Online]. Available at: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-60698374 [accessed March 7, 2022]. BizNews. 2022. National Labour Migration Policy released for public comment, March 2, 2022. [Online]. Available at: https://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/717/225576.html [accessed March 3, 2022]. Corruption Watch. 2022. Solutions abound to SA’s graft problem – political will, not so much, February 14, 2022. [Online]. Available at: https://www.corruptionwatch.org.za/solutions-abound-to-sas-graft-problem-political-will-not-so-much/ [accessed March 7, 2022]. Daily Maverick. 2019. China, South Africa and the middle-income trap, April 23, 2019. [Online]. Available at: https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2019-04-23-china-south-africa-and-the-middle-income-trap/ [accessed March 2, 2022]. Daily Maverick. 2022. South Africa needs renewed citizen activism and political imagination to stop the democratic degradation, January 4, 2022. [Online]. Available at: https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2022-01-04-south-africa-needs-renewed-citizen-activism-and-political-imagination-to-stop-the-democratic-degradation/ [accessed March 10, 2022]. Engineering News. 2021. Report warns that industrialisation-through-localisation could stunt South Africa’s development, November 16, 2021. [Online]. Available at: https://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/report-warns-that-industrialisation-through-localisation-could-stunt-south-africas-development-2021-11-16 [accessed March 2, 2022]. IOL. 2021. Sectoral Master Plans playing a vital role in reviving SA manufacturing, June 30, 2021. [Online]. Available at: https://www.iol.co.za/business-report/opinion/sectoral-master-plans-playing-a-vital-role-in-reviving-sa-manufacturing-6873b700-9d37-47f2-836d-89f68aa589ef [accessed March 7, 2022]. Mail and Guardian. 2021. Intensifying economic insecurity may threaten South Africa’s social cohesion, February 16, 2021. [Online]. Available at: https://mg.co.za/opinion/2021-02-16-intensifying-economic-insecurity-may-threaten-south-africas-social-cohesion/ [accessed March 10, 2022]. National Treasury. 2021. Budget Review 2021. [Online]. Available at: http://www.treasury.gov.za/documents/national%20budget/2021/review/Chapter%202.pdf [accessed March 2, 2022]. News24. 2021. SA lost R1.5 trillion to corruption in five years and continues to bleed – report, June 23, 2021. [Online]. Available at: https://www.news24.com/fin24/economy/south-africa/sa-lost-r15-trillion-to-corruption-in-five-years-and-continues-to-bleed-report-20210623 [accessed March 7, 2022]. OECD. 2021. South Africa Economic Snapshot. [Online]. Available at: https://www.oecd.org/economy/south-africa-economic-snapshot/ [accessed March 2, 2022]. SA History. 2013. South Africa’s Key economic policies changes (1994 - 2013). [Online]. Available at: https://www.sahistory.org.za/article/south-africas-key-economic-policies-changes-1994 2013 [accessed March 7, 2022]. Statista. 2022. African countries with the highest Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2021, February 1, 2022. [Online]. Available at: https://www.statista.com/statistics/1120999/gdp-of-african-countries-by-country/ [accessed March 2, 2022]. Statistics South Africa. 2021. The South African economy sheds more than half a million jobs in the 3rd quarter of 2021, November 30, 2021. [Online]. Available at: http://www.statssa.gov.za/?p=14922 [accessed March 7, 2022]. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - This report has been published by the Inclusive Society Institute The Inclusive Society Institute (ISI) is an autonomous and independent institution that functions independently from any other entity. It is founded for the purpose of supporting and further deepening multi-party democracy. The ISI’s work is motivated by its desire to achieve non-racialism, non-sexism, social justice and cohesion, economic development and equality in South Africa, through a value system that embodies the social and national democratic principles associated with a developmental state. It recognises that a well-functioning democracy requires well-functioning political formations that are suitably equipped and capacitated. It further acknowledges that South Africa is inextricably linked to the ever transforming and interdependent global world, which necessitates international and multilateral cooperation. As such, the ISI also seeks to achieve its ideals at a global level through cooperation with like-minded parties and organs of civil society who share its basic values. In South Africa, ISI’s ideological positioning is aligned with that of the current ruling party and others in broader society with similar ideals. Email: info@inclusivesociety.org.za Phone: +27 (0) 21 201 1589 Web: www.inclusivesociety.org.za

  • Workshop on "Populism(s) and social cohesion in Southern Africa: a regional, a global challenge?"

    11-12 May 2022, Cape Town, South Africa On 11 and 12 May, the Institute participated in the workshop on ‘Populism(s) and social cohesion in Southern Africa: a regional challenge, a global challenge?’ The workshop was hosted by the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, in partnership with the Research Institute Social Cohesion, based at the University of Leipzig, Germany. Participants from across Southern Africa were invited to share their insights and inputs regarding the broad challenges associated with populism and the changing meaning of social cohesion. Participants represented a wide array of organizations, think tanks, labour unions and the academy. The two-day event allowed for a meaningful discussion on the current debates in South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe. This multilateral approach allowed participants to engage their neighbours while relating regional tendencies with their German co-hosts. Whilst case studies on populism(s) and socio-cultural dynamics have developed over the last years, the Southern African region has lagged in regard to producing comparative projects. This workshop offered a valuable opportunity to build regional partnerships and exchanges. The Institute was represented by Dr Klaus Kotzé who delivered an Occasional Paper titled Social Cohesion: Taking stock of South Africa’s socio-political strategy. The paper which was launched at the workshop discusses the meaning and significance of social cohesion in South Africa. It probes how social cohesion forms part of the Constitutional project, whilst suggesting that for social cohesion to be meaningful (and sustainable) it needs to evolve to become a term of transformative consequence

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  • ISI | Media Coverage

    Media Coverage May 18, 2022 ​ Here Is Why SA Citizens Hate Immigrants ​ Opera News Up May 15, 2022 ​ SA citizens don’t trust immigrants, says survey ​ Trumpet International Magazine: Omotayo Daranjo Up May 14, 2022 ​ Naweekaktueel: Meer as 10% gekwalifiseerde Suid-Afrikaners wil immigreer ​ RSG: Anita Visser voer onderhoud met Daryl Swanepoel Up May 14, 2022 ​ South Africans don't trust immigrants, survey reveals ​ News 365: Omie Chester Up May 13, 2022 ​ SA citizens don't trust immigrants, says survey ​ IOL Up May 13, 2022 ​ 'Fix the economy' - warns institute amid study showing high number of South Africans want to emigrate ​ IOL Up May 13, 2022 ​ 'Fix the economy' - warns institute amid study showing high number of South Africans want to emigrate ​ MTNPlay (IOL article) Up May 13, 2022 ​ 'Fix the economy' - warns institute amid study showing high number of South Africans want to emigrate ​ Hebdenbridge News Up May 13, 2022 ​ Over 10% of South Africans with higher education qualifications are considering emigrating: Study ​ Newzroom Africa: Daryl Swanepoel Up May 12, 2022 ​ Big brain drain alert: Over 10% of educated South Africans want to emigrate ​ African News Agency: Molaole Montsho Up May 12, 2022 ​ Big brain drain alert: Over 10% of educated South Africans want to emigrate ​ IOL Up May 10, 2022 ​ Structural reform across the board needed to pave way for SA welfare state ​ Daily Maverick: Dr Klaus Kotzé Up May 10, 2022 ​ Structural reform across the board needed to pave way for SA welfare state ​ Banoyi: Dr Klaus Kotzé Up May 06, 2022 ​ South Africans don't trust foreigners of any origin ​ Mail & Guardian: Bongeka Gumede Up Apr 27, 2022 ​ SA citizens no longer trust immigrants - says new survey ​ Opera News Up Apr 24, 2022 ​ SA citizens don't trust immigrants, says survey ​ Weekend Argus: Brenda Masilela Up Apr 18, 2022 ​ Efficient logistics needed to keep agri exports on the right track ​ World News: Daryl Swanepoel Up Apr 18, 2022 ​ Efficient logistics needed to keep agri exports on the right track ​ Business Day: Daryl Swanepoel Up Apr 16, 2022 ​ African nations must base foreign policy on domestic interests, not past ideological ties ​ The Namibian: William Gumede Up Apr 14, 2022 ​ Artistic concepts of hope can scale back inequality in South Africa ​ The Indian Express: Anja Smith, Jodi Wishnia, Carmen Christian & Daryl Swanepoel Up Apr 13, 2022 ​ We have to be creative and harness ideas of hope to reduce inequality in South Africa ​ Daily Maverick: Anja Smith, Jodi Wishnia, Carmen Christian & Daryl Swanepoel Up Apr 13, 2022 ​ Creative ideas of hope can reduce inequality ​ Articleslider: Anja Smith, Jodi Wishnia, Carmen Christian & Daryl Swanepoel Up Apr 12, 2022 ​ The Russia-Ukraine War: What has been the impact on South Africa and fellow BRICS (Brasil, Russia, India, China, SA) members and on African economies ​ ResearchGate: William Gumede Up Apr 11, 2022 ​ African nations must base foreign policy on hame care ... ​ newsfounded.com: William Gumede Up Apr 11, 2022 ​ African nations must base foreign policy on domestic interests, not past ideological ties ​ Daily Maverick: William Gumede Up Apr 11, 2022 ​ Graft still a big problem ​ The Citizen: Daryl Swanepoel Up Apr 11, 2022 ​ Little done to bring the thieves to book ​ The Citizen: Editorial Up Apr 02, 2022 ​ 'Apartheid was 'n welsynstaat vir wit mense' ​ Die Burger: Murray La Vita Up Apr 02, 2022 ​ 'Apartheid was 'n welsynstaat vir wit mense' ​ Netwerk24: Murray La Vita Up Apr 01, 2022 ​ Die Burger se praat saam-diskoersreeks - Hoe floreer die private sektor in 'n welsynstaat? ​ KKNK 2022 Gesprekke Up Mar 31, 2022 ​ Rejuvenating SA's economy - a labour sector perspective ​ Business Day: Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 29, 2022 ​ Es probable que Ramaphosa gane la conferencia electiva del ANC ​ ES Postsus Up Mar 28, 2022 ​ Ramaphosa likely to win ANC elective conference and lead a coalition government in 2024 - research reports ​ Daily Maverick: Ferial Haffajee Up Mar 23, 2022 ​ Media statement: Home Affairs Committee concludes countrywide public consultation process ​ RSA Parliament: Media Statement Up Mar 23, 2022 ​ Discussions to fix Eskom's woes ​ IOL: Ntombi Nkosi Up Mar 22, 2022 ​ Conditions needed in a society to enable it to advance towards a welfare state ​ The Voice of the Cape: Interview with Dr Klaus Kotzé Up Mar 18, 2022 ​ Crisis in Europe highlights critical importance of selfsufficient, secure and stable energy production ​ Business Day: Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 13, 2022 ​ Government must get back to basics to build a better economy ​ Head Topics: Business Day - Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 13, 2022 ​ Government must get back to basics to build a better economy ​ Business Day: Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 06, 2022 ​ Inclusive Society Institute says Electoral Bill does not respond to society's expectations for fundamental electoral reform ​ Independent Candidate Association South Africa Up Mar 06, 2022 ​ Inclusive Society Institute says Electoral Bill does not respond to society's expectations for fundamental electoral reform ​ IOL: Mayibongwe Maqhina Up Mar 02, 2022 ​ New Electoral Amendment Bill slated ​ Oudtshoorn Courant: Citizen reporter Up Mar 02, 2022 ​ New Electoral Amendment Bill slated ​ George Hearld: Source Citizen reporter Up Mar 02, 2022 ​ Media statement: Home Affairs Committee assures South Africans about a meaningful public participation process to be undertaken ​ RSA Parliament: Media statement Up Mar 01, 2022 ​ New Electoral Amendment Bill slated ​ The Citizen: Article by Lunga Simelane Up Mar 01, 2022 ​ New Electoral Amendment Bill slated ​ The Daily Mirror: Article by Tshepo Mohale Up Mar 01, 2022 ​ SA's electoral system is ripe for radical change, OSA tells Parliament ​ News24: Article by Jason Felix Up Feb 21, 2022 ​ What the ANC can learn from Singapore's People's Action Party ​ Business Day: Opinion piece by Prof William Gumede Up Feb 15, 2022 ​ Reuse tekort aan digitale vaardighede in Suid-Afrika ​ KykNET Verslag: Ilze-Marie Le Roux gesels met kenners oor wat aget die tekort steek en hoe dit aangespreek kan word Up Feb 13, 2022 ​ Social democracy - A pathway for South Africa's development ​ Opera News article by Carole-Tee Up Feb 13, 2022 ​ Social democracy - A pathway for South Africa's development ​ IOL article by Dr Klaus Kotzé Up Feb 10, 2022 ​ Can South Africa afford the NHI? ​ Discourse ZA interview with Anja Smith Up Feb 10, 2022 ​ SA's chronic disregard of logistics woes stops mines benefiting from bullish markets ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Feb 07, 2022 ​ Investing in the ICT sector is a no-brainer ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Feb 05, 2022 ​ Bleak picture for SA The Citizen article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Feb 03, 2022 ​ Preventing corruption is the key ​ Daily News article by Willie Hofmeyr Up Feb 03, 2022 ​ Preventing corruption is the key ​ Cape Argus article by Willie Hofmeyr Up Feb 03, 2022 ​ Preventing corruption is the key ​ IOL article by Willie Hofmeyr Up Feb 02, 2022 ​ Achieving wellbeing equality for South Africans is a dream that should not be deferred ​ Africa Focus article by Anja Smith, Dave Strugnell and Daryl Swanepoel Up Feb 02, 2022 ​ Achieving wellbeing equality for South Africans is a dream that should not be deferred ​ Daily Maverick article by Anja Smith, Dave Strugnell and Daryl Swanepoel Up Jan 27, 2022 ​ Corruption has eroded integrity ​ Cape Argus article by Professor Pregala Solosh Pillay Up Jan 27, 2022 ​ Corruption has eroded integrity ​ IOL article by Professor Pregala Solosh Pillay Up Jan 27, 2022 ​ Corruption has eroded integrity ​ The Star article by Professor Pregala Solosh Pillay Up Jan 27, 2022 ​ Corruption has eroded integrity ​ Daily News article by Professor Pregala Solosh Pillay Up Jan 20, 2022 ​ Anti-corruption agencies need to be nurtured ​ Daily News article by Andrew Spalding Up Jan 20, 2022 ​ Anti-corruption agencies need to be nurtured ​ IOL article by Andrew Spalding Up Jan 20, 2022 ​ Anti-corruption agencies need to be nurtured ​ The Star article by Andrew Spalding Up Jan 20, 2022 ​ Anti-corruption agencies need to be nurtured ​ Cape Argus article by Andrew Spalding Up Jan 13, 2022 ​ No short cuts in fight against graft ​ The Star article by Drago Kos Up Jan 13, 2022 ​ No short cuts in fight against graft ​ Cape Argus article by Drago Kos Up Jan 13, 2022 ​ No short cuts in fight against graft ​ Daily News article by Drago Kos Up Jan 12, 2022 ​ Construction sector itching to team up with government to build SA ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Jan 6, 2022 ​ Conducting a proper diagnosis ​ Cape Argus article on presentation by Abiola Makinwa Up Jan 6, 2022 ​ Conducting a proper diagnosis ​ Daily News article on presentation by Abiola Makinwa Up Jan 6, 2022 ​ Conducting a proper diagnosis ​ The Star Early Edition article on presentation by Abiola Makinwa Up Dec 31, 2021 ​ #integritasza Monthly ​ December 2021 | vol 10 Up Dec 9, 2021 ​ The state of public integrity in South Africa ​ Opera News article on speech by Vusi Khanyile Up Dec 9, 2021 ​ Retail sector needs knives removed from its back ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Dec 8, 2021 ​ State of public integrity in SA ​ Africa Press article on speech by Vusi Khanyile Up Dec 8, 2021 ​ State of public integrity in SA IOL article on speech by Vusi Khanyile Up Dec 8, 2021 ​ State of public integrity in SA ​ Daily News article on speech by Vusi Khanyile Up Dec 8, 2021 ​ State of public integrity in SA ​ Cape Argus article on speech by Vusi Khanyile Up Dec 4, 2021 ​ Government needs to be humane, 'we can't be like robots' - Sooliman ​ JacarandaFM article by Sibahle Motha Up Nov 17, 2021 ​ Think small for a big impact ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Nov 11, 2021 ​ ISI presents NHI and Inequality research outcomes ​ The Voice of the Cape interview with Anja Smith Up Nov 11, 2021 ​ SA's Jekyll & Hyde economy puts investors in two minds ​ The World News article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Nov 11, 2021 ​ SA's Jekyll & Hyde economy puts investors in two minds ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Nov 5, 2021 ​ SA needs urgent security check ​ Daily News article by Daryl Swanepoel and Roelf Meyer Up Nov 5, 2021 ​ SA needs urgent security check ​ The Star Early Edition article by Daryl Swanepoel and Roelf Meyer Up Nov 5, 2021 ​ SA needs urgent security check ​ Cape Argus article by Daryl Swanepoel and Roelf Meyer Up Nov 2, 2021 ​ 'We anticipated this': ANC's Jessie Duarte analyses... The New York Press News Agency Up Nov 2, 2021 ​ 'We anticipated this': ANC's Jessie Duarte analyses the party's poor poll performance ​ Daily Maverick article by Ferial Haffajee Up Oct 20, 2021 ​ Does South Africa need a new anti-corruption body or a new modus operandi? ​ Daily Maverick: Des Erasmus Up Oct 20, 2021 ​ Anti-corruption dialogue: SA is not a poor country - it's poorly managed, say experts ​ IOL article by Tarryn-Leigh Solomons Up Oct 19, 2021 ​ Ex-AFU chief Willie Hofmeyr says law enforcement contaminated by corruption ​ IOL article by Tarryn-Leigh Solomons Up Sep 21, 2021 ​ Economic inclusion through financial literacy - a stimulus for economic growth in South Africa ​ ASI Financial Services article by Sershnee Pillay Up Sep 16, 2021 ​ Nous devons examiner les coûts de NHI dans 20 ans avant de nous précipiter - il existe des alternatives moins chères et plus efficaces ​ Nouvelles du monde Up Sep 15, 2021 ​ We must look at the costs of NHI 20 years from now before rushing in - there are cheaper, more effective alternatives All Africa article by Anja Smith, Jodi Wishnia and Shivani Ranchod Up Sep 15, 2021 ​ We must look at the costs of NHI 20 years from now before rushing in - there are cheaper, more effective alternatives Daily Maverick article by Anja Smith, Jodi Wishnia and Shivani Ranchod Up Sep 15, 2021 ​ South Africa: Electoral reform ​ Electoral Institute for Sustainable Democracy in Africa Up Sep 14, 2021 ​ Priorities for municipal reform ​ The Star Late Edition article by Nondumiso Alice Sithole Up Sep 14, 2021 ​ Priorities for municipal reform ​ Cape Argus article by Nondumiso Alice Sithole Up Sep 7, 2021 ​ Can our intelligence community ever curb crime in SA? ​ The Voice of the Cape interview with Daryl Swanepoel Up Sep 7, 2021 ​ Concerns about the high levels of crime in the country ​ Newzroom Afrika interview with Roelf Meyer Up Sep 7, 2021 ​ South African courts: Are they guilty of judicial overreach or merely upholding the rule of law? ​ IOL article by Wendy Andrew-Befeld Up Sep 7, 2021 ​ SA courts have upheld their duty ​ The Star Late Edition article Up Sep 7, 2021 ​ Are they guilty of judicial excesses or of simple respect for the rule of law? ​ Eminetra article by Andrew Aldridge Up Sep 6, 2021 ​ Crisis in crime intelligence ​ The Citizen article by Simnikiwe Hlatshaneni Up Sep 5, 2021 ​ South Africa's crime intelligence is politicised, riddled with nepotism and factionalism - and broken ​ All Africa: Daryl Swanepoel and Roelf Meyer Up Sep 5, 2021 ​ South Africa's crime intelligence is politicised, riddled with nepotism and factionalism - and broken ​ Daily Maverick article by Daryl Swanepoel and Roelf Meyer Up Aug 27, 2021 ​ US-Africa ties in relation to China ​ Cape Argus article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Aug 15, 2021 ​ Ditching our regulatory load could revive factories to fire up growth engine ​ The World News article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Aug 15, 2021 ​ Ditching our regulatory load could revive factories to fire up growth engine ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Aug 5, 2021 ​ Stabilising SOEs is critical, and some progress has been made ​ Business Day article by Isaac Matshego Up Jul 7, 2021 ​ SA electoral reform could lead to a bigger ANC ​ Business Day article Up Jul 6, 2021 ​ SA must surf the wave of global recovery ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Jun 29, 2021 ​ Economic inclusion through financial literacy ​ The Star article by Sershnee Pillay Up Jun 21, 2021 ​ SA needs a detailed road map and unified vision for decarbonation ​ Business Day article by Loammi Wolf Up Jun 17, 2021 ​ The big electoral reform headache: How to do justice to democracy without creating a monster ​ Daily Maverick article by Loammi Wolf Up Jun 11, 2021 ​ Electoral reform: it simply cannot be buried this time ​ Organisation Undoing Tax Abuse article Up Jun 10, 2021 ​ Electoral reform and the party fly in the accountability ointment ​ Daily Maverick article by Susan Booysen Up May 30, 2021 ​ Despite SA's red tape, corruption and lack of skills, hope prevails ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up May 21, 2021 ​ Hier's nou 'n geleentheid vir verandering ​ Vrye Weekblad artikel deur Carol Paton Up May 17, 2021 ​ Rare opportunity for change has arrived on the doorstep Business Day article by Carol Paton Up May 14, 2021 ​ Electoral reform: Slim chance South African MPs would represent constituents before parties ​ Constitutionally Speaking article by Pierre de Vos Up May 14, 2021 ​ Electoral reform: Slim chance South African MPs would represent constituents before parties ​ Daily Maverick article by Pierre de Vos Up May 13, 2021 ​ Accountability a priority ​ Cape Argus article by Daryl Swanepoel Up May 5, 2021 ​ Here's what SA voters want, according to a new survey ​ Affluencer article by Zandile Khumalo Up May 5, 2021 ​ Here's what SA voters want, according to a new survey ​ The Daily Mirror article by Tshepo Mohale Up May 5, 2021 ​ Here's what SA voters want, according to a new survey ​ The Citizen article by Simnikiwe Hlatshaneni Up Apr, 2021 ​ From the unconstitutional to the constitutional - A refined South African electoral model ​ Umrabulo article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Apr 16, 2021 ​ World Bank calls for growth-enhancing policies to re-align SA economy ​ The World News article Up Apr 16, 2021 ​ World Bank calls for growth-enhancing policies to re-align SA economy ​ Channel Africa article Up Apr 16, 2021 ​ World Bank calls for growth-enhancing policies to re-align SA economy ​ Business Report article by Siphelele Dludla Up Apr 16, 2021 ​ World Bank calls for growth-enhancing policies to re-align SA economy ​ Cape Times article by Siphelele Dludla Up Apr 16, 2021 ​ World Bank calls for growth-enhancing policies to re-align SA economy ​ The Mercury article by Siphelele Dludla Up Apr 16, 2021 ​ World Bank calls for growth-enhancing policies to re-align SA economy ​ Pretorial News article by Siphelele Dludla Up Apr 16, 2021 ​ World Bank calls for growth-enhancing policies to re-align SA economy ​ The Star Early Edition article by Siphelele Dludla Up Apr 16, 2021 ​ Bank of Ghana News Brief ​ News summaries from foreign and local media Up Apr 9, 2021 ​ Spektrum: Verkiesingshervorming in Suid-Afrika ​ RSG onderhoud me Roelf Meyer Up Apr 1, 2021 ​ Maimane's plan to run for president in 2024 ​ Financial Mail article by Natasha Marrian Up Mar 28, 2021 ​ South Africa is ripe for electoral reform ​ Moneyweb article by Roger Southall Up Mar 28, 2021 ​ Electoral reform is needed, and now, but will the ANC allow it? ​ Business Day article by Roger Southall Up Mar 27, 2021 ​ A reformist group in the ANC is lobbying for major change to the electoral system ​ Newzroom Afrika interview with Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 26, 2021 ​ Institute warns of a potential rise in unemployment ​ The Mercury article by Dludla Siphelele Up Mar 26, 2021 ​ Institute warns of a potential rise in unemployment ​ Pretoria News article by Dludla Siphelele Up Mar 26, 2021 ​ Institute warns of a potential rise in unemployment ​ Cape Times article by Dludla Siphelele Up Mar 24, 2021 ​ Electoral Reform Latest: Why the time for change may be ripe in SA ​ The South African article by Lyse Comins Up Mar 24, 2021 ​ South Africa is ripe for electoral reform ​ The Conversation article by Roger Southall ​ - republished by University of the Witwatersrand Up Mar 22, 2021 ​ South Africa is ripe for electoral reform. Why its time might have come ​ The Conversation article by Roger Southall ​ - republished by Investing.com Up Mar 22, 2021 ​ South Africa is ripe for electoral reform. Why its time might have come ​ The Conversation article by Roger Southall ​ - republished by Modern Ghana Up Mar 22, 2021 ​ South Africa is ripe for electoral reform. Why its time might have come ​ The Conversation article by Roger Southall ​ - republished by All Africa Up Mar 22, 2021 ​ South Africa is ripe for electoral reform. Why the time has come ​ The Conversation article by Roger Southall Up Mar 22, 2021 ​ South Africa is ripe for electoral reform. Why the time has come ​ Eminetra article Up Mar 21, 2021 ​ Human Rights Day | Building a non-racial society in SA with Daryl Swanepoel ​ SABC News interview with Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 10, 2021 ​ Alternative proposals for electing constituency representatives in a mixed system ​ PoliticsWeb article by Charles Simkins Up Mar 8, 2021 ​ WATCH: Electoral reform in SA offers hope ​ Business Day TV: Michael Avery talks to a panel about how nongovernmental organisations have been hard at work devising new ways to fix the electoral system Up Mar 5, 2021 ​ Proposed new electoral system passes muster ​ Daily News article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 5, 2021 ​ Proposed new electoral system passes muster ​ Cape Argus article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 2, 2021 ​ Electoral reform in the air: Two new reports chart way forward for South Africa ​ Democracy Works Foundation article Up Feb 28, 2021 ​ ANC dink diep oor Roelf se kies-plan ​ Netwerk24 article by Jan de Lange Up Feb 26, 2021 ​ Judith February: SA's electoral system is weakened by the lack of accountability ​ Eyewitness News article by Judith February Up Feb 24, 2021 ​ Proposed electoral model for South Africa ​ Polity coverage of ISI report Up Feb 23, 2021 ​ Electoral reform in the air: Two new reports chart way forward for South Africa ​ Daily Maverick article by Rebecca Davis Up Feb 22, 2021 ​ Does South Africa need a new electoral system? ​ SAfm Sunrise interview with Roelf Meyer Up Feb 21, 2021 ​ Bring kiesafdelings terug, sê Roelf ​ Netwerk24 article by Jan de Lange Up Feb 21, 2021 ​ New electoral system proposed ​ City Press article by Jan de Lange Up Feb 11, 2021 ​ Survey: New electoral model for South Africa - your input needed ​ West Coast Chamber of Commerce article Up Feb 9, 2021 ​ Now that the world is different, our plans for health reform need to change too ​ Business Day article by Shivani Ranchod Up Feb 3, 2021 ​ Lower population growth could significantly reduce unemployment - report ​ Engineering News article by Thabi Madiba Up Feb 3, 2021 ​ Slowing the population growth rate is vital for South Africa's economic recovery ​ Polity coverage of ISI report Up Jan 31, 2021 ​ Economic recovery hinges on slowing SA's population growth rate ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Jan 8, 2021 ​ Manageable inflation and sustainable exchange rates are crucial for development ​ News24 article by William Gumede Up Dec 17, 2020 ​ Africa's relations quandary ​ Cape Argus article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Dec 14, 2020 ​ Effect of COVID-19 on SMME performance in the Eastern Cape ​ Eastern Cape Socio Economic Consultative Council report by Iniobong Akpan Up Dec 14, 2020 ​ South Africa should tackle racism and corruption openly and honestly ​ Polity opinion piece by Daryl Swanepoel Up Dec 11, 2020 ​ 'Accept realities of race' ​ The Citizen article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Dec 4, 2020 ​ Proposal for solidarity tax on personal incomes, turnovers ​ Cape Argus article by Edward West Up Nov 12, 2020 ​ Africa is undergoing a challenging merger ​ Cape Argus article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Nov 9, 2020 ​ Social cohesion, social justice and the South African dream ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Nov 1, 2020 ​ These universal health coverage scenarios provide viable ways to reach goals ​ Business Day article by Anja Smith, Jodi Wishnia, Shivani Ranchod and Daryl Swanepoel Up Oct 7, 2020 ​ The cost of homophobia in Africa: Hate sponsored by historic fallacies, omissions and silencing of same sex desiring communities Up Oct 1, 2020 ​ Out of the closet and into the streets Up Sep 30, 2020 ​ Developing a new economic blueprint for SA - Lessons from South Korea Up Sep 29, 2020 ​ Lessons from South Korea on mobilising a country's citizenry ​ Business Day article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Sep 2, 2020 ​ SA's position on UN reform ​ Cape Argus article by Daryl Swanepoel Up Aug 17, 2020 ​ Experts to probe changes to electoral system ​ Polity article by Sane Dhlamini Up Aug 11, 2020 ​ Universal health coverage (UHC) pathways for South Africa: areas of misalignment between stakeholders on the NHI BIL require further engagement ​ Engineering News article by Creamer Media reporter Up Aug 4, 2020 ​ US-China tension hurting Africa? ​ Cape Argus article by Susan Walsh Up Jul 25, 2020 ​ Survey: LGBTQ South Africans facing mental health crisis ​ Mamba Online article by Roberto Igual Up Jul 23, 2020 ​ LGBTQ+ community says more needs to be done ​ IOL article by Mphathi Nxumalo Up Jul 21, 2020 ​ Survey on the lived experience of the LGBT+ community in SA ​ Coverage of ISI report Up Jul 20, 2020 ​ Overview of the current state of the economy and the prospects of overcoming the crisis in the world ​ Prepared by the Directorate for International and Regional Cooperation of the Roscongress Foundation Up Jul 20, 2020 ​ African social and political context in the conditions of the Coronavirus: Stabilization or effect of a powder drug? ​ Prepared by the Directorate for International and Regional Cooperation of the Roscongress Foundation Up Jun 10, 2020 ​ 厚德国际智库与南非社会发展研究院签署战略合作协议 ​ Ifeng Finance article Up Jun 6, 2020 ​ Strategic partnership MOU signed between Houde Institute and Inclusive Society Institute (ISI) in South Africa ​ People's Daily Online article by Liu Chang Up Jun 1, 2020 ​ COVID-19 SMME scenarios (Draft A) ​ Department of Small Business Development Report Up Apr 27, 2020 ​ COVID-19 epidemic in SA (February - April 2020) ​ African Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences Up Apr 17, 2020 ​ SMMEs may have shed an estimated 813 000 jobs during lockdown ​ Business Report article by Sizwe Dlamini Up Apr 3, 2020 ​ Coronavirus and Africa - in South Africa, a Fast and Decisive Response ​ Blog post by Institut Montaigne ​ Contribution by Inclusive Society Institute Up Up

  • ISI | Media Releases

    Media Releases May 11, 2022 ​ Op-Ed: The preconditions for a South African welfare state ​ by Dr Klaus Kotzé Up Apr 11, 2022 ​ Op-Ed: Leveraging ideas of hope to reduce inequality in South Africa ​ by Anja Smith, Jodi Wishnia, Carmen Christian and Daryl Swanepoel Up Apr 11, 2022 ​ Op-Ed: The Russia-Ukraine conflict: Impact on South Africa, fellow BRICS members and Africa ​ by William Gumede Up Apr 07, 2022 ​ Op-Ed: The establishment of a National Anti-Corruption Agency for South Africa ​ by Daryl Swanepoel Up Apr 06, 2022 ​ Op-Ed: Rejuvenating South Africa's economy - a labour sector perspective ​ by Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 28, 2022 ​ Op-Ed: Efficient logistics needed to keep agri-exports on the right track ​ by Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 14, 2022 ​ Op-Ed: Back to basics to better economy - Getting fundamentals right will reverse economic woes ​ by Daryl Swanepoel Up Mar 10, 2022 ​ Op-Ed: Crisis in Europe highlights critical importance of self-sufficient, secure and stable energy production ​ by Daryl Swanepoel Up Feb 16, 2022 ​ Social Democracy: A pathway for South Africa's development ​ by Dr Klause Kotzé Up Feb 03, 2022 ​ WEF Global Risks Report 2022 suggests it cannot be business as usual ​ Up Feb 02, 2022 ​ Preventing corruption is the key ​ by Willie Hofmeyr Up Jan 31, 2022 ​ South Africa investing in the ICT sector is a no-brainer ​ by Daryl Swanepoel Up Jan 28, 2022 ​ The effects of corruption ​ by Prof Pregala Solosh Pillay Up Jan 17, 2022 ​ Anti-corruption agencies need to be nurtured ​ by Prof Andrew Spalding Up Jan 13, 2022 ​ Different types of anti-corruption agencies ​ by Drago Kos Up Jan 12, 2022 ​ Construction sector: A friend in need is a friend indeed. Let the private sector help Up Dec 7, 2021 ​ Rejuvenating South Africa's economy - a retail sector perspective Up Dec 3, 2021 ​ Speech delivered by Vusi Khanyile, Chairperson of the Inclusive Society Institute, to the Integritasza Conference, Wellington, South Africa Up Nov 11, 2021 ​ ISI meets Deputy Minister of Finance - Present NHI and Inequality research outcomes Up Nov 8, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: Rejuvenating South Africa's economy - A SMME sector perspective Up Nov 8, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: South Africa needs an urgent national security and intelligence assessment Up Nov 2, 2021 ​ ANC support dips, but it is still best placed to win local government election Up Nov 2, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: SA's Jekyll and Hyde economy has investors second guessing Up Sep 16, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: Would you choose NHI as our universal health care scheme if you knew the costs twenty years from now? Up Sep 15, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: Local government challenges: How far have we come? Up Sep 8, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: South African courts: Are they guilty of judicial overreach or merely upholding the rule of law? Up Sep 6, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: Assessing crime intelligence in South Africa Up Aug 27, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: Rebuilding US-Africa relations under the Biden administration and its nexus with China Up Aug 13, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: Reviving factories can fire up a much-needed growth engine Up Aug 11, 2021 ​ South Africa's developmental model: The significance of state-owned enterprises Up Jun 23, 2021 ​ Challenging climate change: The transition to a sustainable economy Up Jun 10, 2021 ​ No quick fixes for SA's woes but glimmer of hope on the horizon Up May 31, 2021 ​ Restoring faith in South Africa key to rejuvenating the economy Up May 5, 2021 ​ Survey suggests voter support for party system in SA Up Apr 8, 2021 ​ ISI presents electoral system proposals to IEC Up Mar 16, 2021 ​ COVID-19: Severe blow to long-term employment prospects Up Jan 28, 2021 ​ Speech by Daryl Swanepoel, CEO, Inclusive Society Institute, South Africa: International Conference on Poverty Alleviation: China's rationale, Beijing, China Up Jan 25, 2021 ​ Op-Ed: Slowing the population growth is vital for South Africa's economic recovery Up Dec 11, 2020 ​ Op-Ed: The US-China-Africa nexus under a Biden administration Up Dec 11, 2020 ​ Op-Ed: ISI Annual Lecture with Justice Albie Sachs ​ Prosperity through inclusivity Up Aug 13, 2020 ​ Op-Ed: South African and the 12th summit of BRICS Up Aug 12, 2020 ​ Op-Ed: Universal Health Coverage pathways for South Africa ​ Areas of misalignment between stakeholders on the NHI Bill require further engagement Up Aug 11, 2020 ​ Universal Health Coverage pathways for South Africa ​ Areas of misalignment between stakeholders on the NHI Bill require further engagement Up Aug 3, 2020 ​ Op-Ed: COVID-19 ​ US-China discord and its impact on Sino-South African relations Up Jul 21, 2020 ​ LGBT+ survey findings ​ Survey on everyday experience of the LGBT+ communicy finds inequality and discrimination still rife, and mental health potentially a crisis in the making Up Jul 14, 2020 ​ National health insurance Bill ​ Parliament's Portfolio Committee would be well-advised first to obtain legal clarity on constitutionality Up May 20, 2020 ​ COVID-19 ​ ANC members and supporters show overwhelming support for government measures and ANC leadership, but are concerned about the future of the economy Up Apr 17, 2020 ​ COVID-19 ​ Survey: COVID-19 and its impact on the SMME sector Up Up

  • | ISI

    Conditions needed in a society to enable it to advance towards a welfare state ​ The Voice of the Cape interview with Dr Klaus Kotzé

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